Revolution Motorcycle Mag, The first Canadian Magazine of Custom Bikes FRANÇAIS  |  ENGLISH


CONTACT US
LINKS

Columns
Painting Vol-15

Painting

by Alain Panneton

I occasionally receive e-mails from readers with questions pertaining to certain technical aspects of custom painting.

Some of these questions relate to the prep work, others to the painting process and others more precisely to the airbrush. For a custom painting to be a success, the preparation must be adequate, the paint well applied and the artistic execution as high as the customer’s expectations. In this article I shall try to answer some of the questions mostly asked, hoping to clear up several points which seem obscure or badly understood.

 

Get the full coverage NOW!
Subscribe to Revolution Motorcycle Mag



Technical

Technical

by André Bobinas

Hi y’all! This one’s for all you glitter cowboys!



Today we’re chit-chat’in about chrome. I’ve been hearing the words “full chrome” for years and still today those words give me visions of total “bling”. However on a technical level it’s really all about finish. Yes once you fabricate or weld that awesome custom made part, what do you do to stop it from corroding? You know that ugly yellow staining that occurs through oxidation. Note that all metals, actually all surfaces, oxidize so you need to protect them. For “in depth” info on the subject I bring you the world of MM Chrome and Polish. Let’s see how it’s done and examine other possibilities.

First let’s see what we can do. Well we can chrome. Chrome is the most common way to coat alloys, steel and yes even plastic (ABS and fiberglass)...

Get the full coverage NOW!
Subscribe to Revolution Motorcycle Mag



Our Readers

Our Readers

DRACOR

By Kent Sheldrake

When I was thinking of a custom bike my vision included something stripped down, raw and exciting however it also had to be built to ride. I wanted something completely different from the Road Glide that I normally ride. It would be a bike that said “let’s fuck’in go” and when you flashed the engine people would just stare. After months of booze fuelled late night design discussions on the feasibility of making my vision a reality, it materialized into what you see here.

I always liked the Exile type flat-black bikes but I wanted chrome as well. I’ve never liked the now typical “colorful” paint job on a custom so the only paint on this bike is on the oil bucket, and it’s pretty much black. Even the frame is powder coated black. When it came to covering the tins (the gas tank and fenders, etc.) we discussed the different options we had when it...

Say it NOW!
info@revolutionmotorcyclemag.com



Show it!

Show it!

Show us your pics!
Send photos of your bike, your trips, your parties, Memories, events, etc.

The funniest will be published. Winner of the year will get full page (once a year).

You must leave your name, address and phone number at the back of each photo with short description. If you include a pre-stamped and pre-addressed envelope we will send it back to you.

Send digital photos to : info@revolutionmotorcyclemag.com

Postal address :
REVOLUTION MOTORCYCLE MAG
1302, Avenue Garden, Mascouche
Québec J7L OA4




Old School

Old School

Gina and Bernie

Gina and Bernie have known each other since 1958 when they were living on Esplanade Street in Montreal, Quebec. Gina’s father, Louis Roter, started riding Harleys after a stint in the Navy during the Second World War. He also loved fixing up and riding old motorcycles. He purchased a forty-five cubic inch Harley-Davidson for sixty eight bucks from a shop called Bentleys Cycle, on Park Avenue just below Sherbrooke beside the Armoury. He rode that thing as much as he could, travelling the country sides at a time when it took days to get from the inner city of Montreal to Mont Tremblant in the Laurentians on single lane dirt roads. His joy of motorcycle travels and tales greatly influence his sons and daughter and of course his future son-in-law Bernie. Because of his love of motorcycles Bernie found himself always hanging around the Roter family home. It was like motorcycle heaven. They tinkered on different old bikes such as a Vincent Black Shadow, a Matchless G50, an Ariel Square 4 and a few Harley side valves. At sixteen years old Bernie bought a Bridgestone and started to ride. From there he moved up to a BSA Rocket 3 then a Harley-Davidson. Gina and Bernie’s childhood friendship eventually lead to...

Get the full coverage NOW!
Subscribe to Revolution Motorcycle Mag





HOME  |  SUBSCRIPTION  |  LINKS  |  CONTACT US  |  VIDEOS
EVENTS  |  COLUMNS  |  FEATURED BIKE |  MISS REVOLUTION  |  TATTOO SECTION
POWERED BY LATE NIGHT STUDIO



Facebook