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Painting

Painting

by Martin Bouchard (Fitto)

You and your airbrush gun - Airbrush Elite

Precision is extremely important if you want to be a good marksman. Investing in a good chair with multiple of adjustment features, angles and heights will help you be more accurate, and it will keep you comfortable for longer periods. Place your neon or conventional lighting so that your shadow does not appear on your work surface. A ventilation system can be kept as simple as getting a furnace fan hooked up to a 10-inch vent pipe that is attached to the side of your work bench. The goal is to pull the maximum amount of vapours away from your facial area.

If you want to play like an actor or a rapper you can hold your airbrush in one hand or even upside down. But if you want the precision of a sniper always try to have both hands on your airbrush gun and have your forearms supported.

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Technical

Technical

by André Bobinas

“ Wham Bam Thank You Mam ” !

The last three months have blasted by so fast but as promised this issue’s technical column is all about rear suspensions.

Early motorcycles had no rear suspension and for that low down, no frills, no nonsense hawg some chopper builders are using hard-tail frames today. Let’s start by taking a look at the different kinds of rear suspension systems. The earliest kind was the plunger type used on BMWs, Ariels and Zundaps. In a way they were the first Softails. Even some aftermarket frame manufacturers have copied the plunger design. It’s not a bad design but because of its limited suspension travel the ride was pretty rough. Remember : the secret to a good ride is suspension travel and the proper preload, compression and rebound. Many years ago, when I rode motocross, if someone jump 8 to 10 feet in the air they were king. Today kids jump over 20 feet in the air all because of shock travel. It went from around 8 inches in the pass to over 20 inches today. Like front forks the same principles apply: preload, compression and rebound.

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Our Readers

Our Readers

By Stéphane Mercier

To those who say that the passion for motorcycles diminishes over time, I would answer this : that’s totally FALSE ! One day not long ago – after a good meal and a discussion about bikes, our favorite topic – one of my good buddies took me to visit a custom bike shop. He knew that after several years without a bike and still having the desire to have one built one day, this visit would push me to take a decision that I wouldn’t regret.

Enter Classic Steel Motorcycles. Jessy, the owner of Classic Steel, informed me on how much it would cost to have a custom bike built to my taste and what were the steps to follow to attain that goal. Leaving the shop I felt like a teenager. My head was filled with ideas, inspiration, and I truly felt that I would soon be able to live my dream.

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Old School

Old School

JIM REPAIR SHOP, Est. 1970

By Charlie Lessard

After about a month of travelling on his old BSA, Jim Roquebrune unequivocally decided that riding was going to be a huge part of his life. His dedication to motorcycles and the pursuant lifestyle that surrounded it is something he has abided by ‘til this day. In 1970 with nine hundred and eighty five dollars saved up Jim walked into Canning’s motorcycle shop in Grenville, Quebec and rode home with a brand new Triumph Tiger 500. At seventeen years old, he was committed.

In the late sixties and early seventies the beginnings of many motorcycle clubs was well underway. In 1971 Jim became a striker for the Argenteuil chapter of Quebec’s Popeye Motorcycle Club.

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Interview - Prairie Harley-Davidson

Interview - Prairie Harley-Davidson

By Charlie Lessard

In 1936 a young gentleman by the name of Grant Budd traveled the long and dusty roads of his native city of Regina atop an ol’ cantankerous motorcycle. Finding it hard to come across parts for his Harley-Davidson Grant would call the motor company in Wisconsin, USA so that he could get parts sent up to him in Canada. After numerous transactions the factory just asked Grant if he would be interested in stocking and selling parts for them in that region. So just for fun more than anything he unintentionally became a Harley dealer. Since that fortunate chain of events Prairie Harley-Davidson (as it’s known today) has become the third oldest dealership in Canada. Originally named Prairie Motorcycle Works Grant Budd set up shop on Albert Street. In the early fifties the shop was moved into two converted houses on Retallack Street as the name was changed to Prairie Motorcycle Ltd. In 1995 the present owners purchased the business and moved it to its current location on 1355 McIntyre Street. This shop located in the trendy warehouse district was built in 1955. Nowadays the very welcoming Rob Hertzog, Caron Zora-Hertzog and Valerie Zora are co-owners and Dealer Principals of PHD.


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