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Painting

Painting

by Martin Bouchard (Fitto)

The Spartacus Project

This is one of my customer’s projects. Christian came to see me with a picture, a written story and a theme already established for the paint work he called Spartacus – like the infamous gladiator. He saw fight scenes across golden sands and blue skies, all very colourful and action-packed. I imagined this bike painted with Christian thoughts and I believed the style of the bike mixed with his ideas would not go well together. As an artist I don’t have the right to say “this is a terrible paint job”, blame the customer for the final result and claim that it was his idea to begin with. As an artist yourself, try to express the views that best fit your qualities and your approach to the concepts in order to maximize the chances of producing something you will like and something that will please others, especially your customer. I think it is very important to communicate properly and make yourself understood. Listen carefully so you can visualize the customer’s ideas.

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Technical

Technical

by André Bobinas

Damn this shit is slippery !

That’s what I said the other day while my hands were covered in lube and yes I was at the shop and I am talking about motor oil so no smart remarks ! So then I thought what a great subject for the next tech article. Questions about oils are probably the most frequently asked therefore I called Marc at HIPERTECH for some frontline info on the mysteries of the slick stuff. Mistake, big mistake ! This guy is the nerd of nerds when cracking the secrets of oil and he is all ours. He was born, raised and works in Canada. Marc sent me so much info with every page as complex as the other that if I write about what he sent me we would all fall asleep before Punxsutawney Phil (that legendary Pennsylvania ground hog) sees his shadow. What I will do is give you the headlines.

We all had to deal with lubricants for an array of reasons. It doesn’t take a university degree to realize that a shaft properly lubricated will slide much easier when inserted into a cylinder.

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Our Readers

Our Readers

By Eric Sauvé

The classic story ! After several years of riding I finally visited a local Harley-Davidson showroom to choose the model I wanted. That’s when it all began : the passion, the need to customize, the need to create ! With the arrival of the big American choppers on our Canadian roads I just couldn’t resist. I wanted to build MY BIKE !

My first project was the modification of an “Ultra” which I completed with pride. From that point on I was hooked ! Subsequently my experience led me to plan a new project. It was born in the Krusty Cycles workshop. Krusty is the proprietor and metal artist who also worked on my first piece of art. Krusty had some chassis available and after a few rough sketches my vision was enlightened. We were on the right track !

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Old School

Old School

OLD DUDE VINTAGE PARTS

By Bob McKay

If you’re into vintage Harley-Davidson’s as a restorer, owner or just a fan then you have probably heard of Clete Borchert. He is more commonly known as “OLD DUDE” by friends and customers that have crossed paths with him in the past 50 years, that’s correct, 50 years ! Clete has been in the motorcycle business since 1963 when he started out as a BSA Mechanic. He quickly made the shift to all things Harley- Davidson and became very well known in and around the home town racetracks of his native Georgia where he campaigned his KR Flat Tracker from 1962-1972. Clete started Old Dude Vintage Parts in 1981 and has been established at his current location since 1988. I had the pleasure of meeting and getting to know Clete this year as I moved down south to Lawrenceville Georgia for a couple of months to get away from the Canadian cold and snow. Focusing lately on restorations myself, I have to say I was pretty excited when I realized that Clete and I were virtually neighbours. His shop is so packed with vintage Harley parts that it’s almost impossible to photograph the inventory. There is so much of it. A modest estimate would place inventory value at around two million bucks; I wonder how much that would be per pound? Even though his building is very large you just can’t find enough space to stand back and see it all at once.

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Interview - Prairie Harley-Davidson

Interview - Steve Drane - Harley-Davidson - Soul to Soul

By Charlie Lessard

Fifty-seven year old Steve Drane has been riding since he was seven. Yes that’s right, fifty years ! The first bike he ever rode was a bicycle with a washing machine motor adapted to it that he and his father put together. According to Steve it was the ugliest looking thing on the block but all the kids in the neighbourhood, in his hometown of Victoria, wanted to ride it. It looked like a scrapyard special but it propelled itself down the street and that’s all that mattered. From that initial taste of two-wheeled freedom Steve progressed to the popular era of Honda 50’s and several other mini and enduro bikes. It wasn’t long before Steve was working on his friend’s motorbikes and any other oddball stuff he could get his hands on. “I had a considerable ‘business’ running out of my parent’s garage,” he said with a chuckle. He used to specialize in putting Suzuki 80cc motors into mini bike frames and because of those early experiences got people riding bigger motorcycles. Steve’s siblings included his older brother and sister as well as his cousin who always seemed to be riding and that’s where Steve first learned as a little kid the do’s and don’ts about elementary maintenance. He came from a family that never took their automobile to the garage. They always found a way to fix things themselves. At the age of thirteen Steve started being tutored after school and on weekends by a friend of his who worked at a motorcycle dealership. The shop’s name was Fredrick Motors and they dealt in Kawasaki’s and Suzuki’s. At sixteen Steve got his driver’s licence which permitted him to get around without asking everyone he knew for a lift. It was also at this time that he started working at Mullins Marine Service after school, on weekends and during school holidays. He got a full time position there after graduating from high school. At that point he had already acquired five years of mechanical experience. Mullins asked Steve to work at a second store they owned where he would be the only mechanic on duty. He performed these duties up until 1976.


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